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EU Code Week and ELT

EU Code Week (6th - 21st October) is a grassroots initiative which aims to bring coding and digital literacy to everybody in a fun and engaging way.


Learning to code helps us to make sense of the rapidly changing world around us, expand our understanding of how technology works, and develop skills and capabilities in order to explore new ideas and innovate.



Coding and 21st century learning

Coders or programmers are people who write the programmes behind everything we see and do on a computer. Most of our students spend several hours playing online games, but few know how to create a game. Learning to code encourages students to become creators, not just consumers of the technology they use, in other words it teaches them to use their personal devices productively rather than distractingly.

When children or adults learn to code, it helps them to develop essential skills such as problem solving, logic and critical thinking. Through coding, we realize that there’s often more than one way…
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26th September: European Day of Languages Games & Activities

With 800 million Europeans represented in the Council of Europe, and 47 member states, it's no wonder that the Council strongly believes in linguistic diversity as a tool for achieving greater intercultural understanding and a key element in the rich cultural heritage of our continent.


The general objectives of the European Day of Languages are to:
alert the public to the importance of language learning and diversify the range of languages learned in order to increase plurilingualism and intercultural understanding;promote the rich linguistic and cultural diversity of Europe;encourage lifelong language learning in and out of school. In keeping with these rules, people, young and old, are encouraged to take up a language, or take special pride in their existing language skills. Also, those responsible for providing access to language learning are encouraged to make it easier for people to learn a range of languages, and to support policy initiatives to promote languages. There is a…

First Day of School Activities

Welcome back!

I really hope you had a great summer break, lots of fun and happy moments and now you are ready for a new school year full of new ideas and activities! Keep Calm and Teach English will try to keep you company throughout the year!

Coming back to school can be challenging for some students and teachers so this is a good opportunity to make our first days enjoyable. To this end I've collected some back to school activities that I have already used with success and some (like the self-portrait project) I would like to try this year.


1. GET-TO-KNOW-YOU ICEBREAKERS
Icebreakers are essential for building relationships and creating a positive classroom culture. A simple Google or Pinterest search of icebreakers will yield tons of fun results. Larry Ferlazzo offers 7 easy icebreakers you can do with post-it notes, all in one neat inforgraphic. 


2. PRINTABLE FACEBOOK PROFILES

Students use social media extensively while schools on the other hand are not always tech friendly. Why…

Panhellenic Exams Past Papers

Panhellenic Exams (the Greek university entrance exams) are just around the corner. Here you can find past papers and keys for the revised exams in English, starting June 2010, in order to make your final preparations.

This year English is examined on Friday, 22nd June at 10:00am.


September 2017

June 2017

June 2017 Key

September 2016

June 2016

June 2016 Key 1Key 2Key 3

September 2015

June 2015 Paper & Key

September 2014

June 2014

June 2014 Key

September 2013

June 2013 Paper & Key
September 2012
June 2012 Paper & Key
September 2011
June 2011 Key
June 2011

September 2010 Key
September 2010
June 2010 Key

June 2010

For information about how foreign languages are examined and the University Departments where English is needed, as well as other relevant material please visit my page on Panhellenic Exams.

Good luck to everyone involved!

Eurovision Song Contest: An EFL Lesson

Are you or your students fans of Eurovision? It's true that it's not everyone's cup of tea; you either love it or hate it.


It's a competition that is supposed to be an expression of European solidarity. Over the years however, it has been accused of being an extravaganza of kitsch pop acts or of promoting political and cultural bias in the way countries form voting blocs.
The following lesson you will find a shot text on the history of the contest, with some practice on the Present and Past Passive, followed by an online trivia quiz for the real fans!

Theme Week: Votes for Women

Have you done Theme Week in your school this year? Have you prepared your material or are you still wondering what to do? Why not talk about women's rights and more specifically the suffrage movement.

In the following page I have gathered some material, worksheets and videos, about the British women's suffrage. Have a look and feel free to use it in your classes.


If you have any material of your own that you would like to share, leave a comment.

Fun Ways to Celebrate 'World Poetry Day'

21st March is World Poetry Day. It is a celebration of poetry for everyone, everywhere. It's a day to promote the reading, writing and teaching of poetry and to connect it with the other arts such as theatre, dance, music and painting. It is a chance to use poetry to say things that can’t be said in prose.

How can we use poetry in the EFL classroom and have fun with our students on this day? Here are some ideas:
An easy way to start is by reading and writing haikus. They are short, easy to write and memorise and can be used with students of any age and level. They are made of three lines with five, seven, five syllables respectively and their themes are usually inspired by nature. For ideas on how to write haikus on paper or online you can visit an older post here.I am poems: students can talk about themselves and express the way they feel, what they hope, think, dream, enjoy and so on. The lines in each poem begin the same way: I am, I wonder, I feel, I hear and so forth. Some se…

Europass: Writing a CV the European way

Writing a CV is a real-life skill our students should practice at least once before leaving High School as it is something they may have to use immediately either for a part-time job or volunteer work or later on for their further education and career.

As a growing number of Europeans move across the continent for work, volunteering and study every year, a CV framework that seems relevant for classroom use isEuropass.Europass is a collection of five documents, two of which are freely accessible: the Curriculum Vitae and the Language Passport. The documents can work both online and as printed templates. Since its official launch in 2005, Europass has helped European citizens make their skills and qualifications clearly and easily understood in Europe. Recently there has been a proposal on a revision of Europasstomake the tool more accessible to all Europeans, including those with disabilities.

Until the update, I've revised an older lesson based on the existing Europass CV page, …